March 21, 2018

Wednesday Haiku #17

One feeds the body but it is necessary to also feed the spirit within
Haiku can help to do that by offering a look at life and nature in words that evoke feeling. Words can create meditation.

Mr. Frog has plucked his Samisen and is ready for bed





" One Note of Zen*"

 A frog has plucked his slack-stringed
samisen;
The Pond was quieter at nightfall,
then.
                                ~~Hȏ- Ȏ












spple blossoms


"Atmosphere"

How still it is!
The belfry's vibrant boom
Does not so much as stir
the cherry-bloom.

                           ~~Shiki








 The Spring Festival


What pains I took to hang my lantern on
the branch of cherry blossom
where it shone.
                         ~~~Shiki





Did you know you can pronounce shōne as shon? Yes, you can.  It fits in the haiku above.
*Zen is meditation and things that can bring on meditation.
In Haiku, Japanese words with multiple syllables are not counted the same way as in English.
The rules for haiku really only apply to Japanese.
I rarely write any Haiku as no one can compare to the masters whose work puts all others to shame.
It's like trying to play piano after Van Cliburn has played.
Tonight it is snowing like crazy and we have almost 10 inches already.
High tide will bring flooding but I think we will be okay.

Raw photos from tonight:


                                                                             

7 comments:

  1. Visiting here is such a lovely way to begin a morning that will included disinterring the car from drifted snow,clearing the driveway and going to work...phooey...and the fallen snow LOOKS so pretty and peaceful ! Haven't measured the stuff,but judging from the topper on the car's roof,we got at least 12" .
    Be warm and well,my friend...
    P.S. - Your photos are wonderful...such a perfect match for the Haiku !

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  2. Such lovely thoughts that bring a sense of peace and well being. And then I look at the snow piling up outside your window and I think, "Wow!" Would I be at such peace in the midst of that "storm"? Praying for you and for the storm to abate and the waters to recede before they reach your door. May the Lord watch over you and yours, and give you peace. (However, I sense you are at peace already. It flows through your words.)

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  3. Thank you, Annie, for sharing about Haiku. I'm interested in knowing how you came by this. Each week it is special to come here and read what you've shared.

    I heard yesterday that the snow storm was to hit NJ shores pretty hard...and it would appear from your pictures above that it certainly was. Ten inches is what we would expect here, but we ended up with enough to barely cover grass.

    Have a wonderful day today, Annie.

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    Replies
    1. I became interested in Haiku and Japanese brush painting when I was about 15 years old.
      Yes, we got a lot of snow, over 12 inches. :)

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  4. Hi Annie, I remember learning about the Haiku in 7th grade English. But I don't remember what I learned! That was 50 years ago! I love the snow pictures. We are going up to the mountains in a couple of weeks. It takes about 2 hours to get there so we will stay overnight. I know I have snow clothes and boots packed somewhere in the garage! Stay warm. Hugs

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  5. I'm really not familiar with Haiku and thought your post was very interesting. I'm sitting here with the back door open, the sun is shining in, a beautiful morning in my part of the world. Maybe the snow will go away soon and you can enjoy some spring weather.

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  6. I do love Haiku and even take a stab at writing it on rare occasions. I like the photos you've selected to go with the poems. I've heard about all the storms in the east. I do hope this is the last one. Even here our temperature dropped again but we didn't get snow down below. Only high above and on the mountain highways.

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